Two donkeys rescued in two days

 In Blog, Rescue Stories
Above: Kate with the rescued boy after she spotted him on the roadside. Below: Back at the shelter after treatment enjoying his relief from pain!

Above: Kate with the rescued boy after she spotted him on the roadside.
Below: Back at the shelter after treatment enjoying his relief from pain!

When volunteer Kate, from the U.K., was coming in to the shelter by riksha, she spotted a donkey by the side of the road with a hugely swollen and injured leg. She stopped the riksha and called us to the rescue, staying by the donkey’s side so that he didn’t wander off. The donkey’s leg was terribly injured from rope tied by his owners to “hobble” him. Donkey owners often hobble their donkeys by tying a front and a back leg together using a coarse rope or plastic material. Even the softest material would need to be taken off after a few hours to avoid injury from rubbing, but somehow this donkey’s owners left the rope until it dug through the skin and muscle. Flies had laid eggs and maggots had infested the wound.

Above: Ganpat holding the donkey just after finding him in the Amba Mata "Aud" community. Below: Back at Animal Aid with a proper splint enjoying green grass and sanctuary.

Above: Ganpat holding the donkey just after finding him in the Amba Mata “Aud” community.
Below: Back at Animal Aid with a proper splint enjoying green grass and sanctuary.

Animal Aid staff Ganesh and Ganpat have been making daily visits to the different donkey-owner communities throughout Udaipur to make friends with their owners, check for injuries, and talk about prevention. This is a 6-month intensive Donkey Injury Prevention Program made possible by a grant from The Brooke India. When Ganesh and Ganpat were in Udaipur’s Amba Mata meeting families and assessing donkeys, they came across a poor boy who had a fracture in his hind leg that his owners had tried to splint. But the problem was that the splint was made by the untrained owners and had completely fallen apart. Not only was it not helping in setting the fracture but it was making it almost impossible for him to even walk because of the pieces of stick jutting out by his hoof. He is safe at Animal Aid now with a proper splint and lots of good food and company. Finding this boy who desperately needed help just a few days after launching the Injury Prevention initiative just makes the case for the importance of having close contact with the owners of the more than 800 donkeys used for hard labor in the city.

 

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